Julia Adeney Thomas

Julia Adeney Thomas writes about Japanese political thought, the environment, and photography.  Her book Reconfiguring Modernity won the John K. Fairbank prize from the American Historical Association and her American Historical Review essay on Japanese wartime memory, “Cataracts of Time,” won the Berkshire Conference of Women Historian’s prize. She recently co-edited Japan at Nature’s Edge with Brett Walker and Ian Miller and Rethinking Historical Distance with Mark Salber Phillips and Barbara Caine.  For the November 2016 issue of the Journal of Asian Studies, she organized a round table on Amitav Ghosh's The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable. She is currently at work on The Historian's Task in the Anthropocene.


CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLES

Oh Say Can You See

IN LEVY HIDEO'S NOVEL A Room Where the Star-Spangled Banner Cannot Be Heard — set in 1967 — anti-American protests roil ...

Oh Say Can You See
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