FEATURED ARTIST

Lost Weekend

LOST WEEKEND

Lost Weekend is an exhibition on view at Galerie Allen and Yvon Lambert in Paris until July 31, 2021. The exhibition title is borrowed from the name John Lennon gave to an 18-month period where he plummeted to personal lows while reaching creative highs. The two galleries had the desire to collaborate and consolidate ideas of exchange between geography, generations and intention. Their version of the well seasoned Mail Art exhibition places a metaphorical fork in the road: 2 artworks leaving an artist’s studio in one part of the world and arriving in Paris to be split between two spaces while symbiotically resonating between each location. Artists in the group show include Kersti Jan Werdal, Etel Adnan, James Benning, Moyra Davey, Simone Fattal, Matt Paweski, and Ryoko Sekiguchi, amongst others.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • Untitled

    by Etel Adnan
    10 x 8 inches
    painting on watercolor paper

  • Untitled

    by James Benning
    12 x 8 inches

  • 2021

    Light 48a

    by Kersti Jan Werdal
    Lightjet C-Print on glossy paper
    5 x 7 inches
    Edition 1 of 1

  • 2021

    UNTITLED (CAFÉ) 1

    by Moyra Davey
    C-Print, Tape, Postage, Ink
    12 x 18 inches

    "When thinking of this show, I looked up the circle of latitude each gallery sits on, and discovered Paris lies on the 48th Parallel North. This is the same latitude as the Olympic Peninsula in the Northwest corner of the United States, an area I spend significant time in, a state I was born and raised. This line connects all locations in the world by an imagined circle. I took a drive up to Neah Bay, Makah Tribal land that is also the furthest northwest point of the state, with the intention of making a picture of the sea in front of me, and another of the forest behind me. I made these pictures, and when I developed the film discovered that two negatives were exposed from the early light that morning, these are the images I chose to print. I intercepted the color with my own interpretation based on the feeling I had when standing in this place."

FEATURED ARTIST

Alexandra Barth

ALEXANDRA BARTH

Chris Sharp Gallery in Los Angeles presents the US solo debut of the Slovakian artist Alexandra Barth. The show runs until July 31, 2021.

Alexandra Barth (b. 1989 Malacky, Slovakia; lives and works in Bratislava) received her degree from the Academy of Fine Arts and Design in Bratislava in 2013. A selection of solo exhibitions have been held at Phoinix, Bratislava (2020), Urban gallery, Pescara (2020), Hotdock project space, Bratislava (2019). Recent group exhibitions include Like a picture, Photoport, Bratislava (2020), The Elevator, Temporary Parapet, Bratislava (2019) and MDŽ, White&Weiss, Bratislava (2017).

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2021

    Yellow Table

    Acrylic on canvas
    47.2 x 74.8 inches

  • 2021

    Blue Pillow

    Acrylic on canvas
    47.2 x 35.4 inches

  • 2020

    Leaves

    Acrylic on canvas
    59 x 47.2 inches

  • 2021

    Tablecloth

    Acrylic on canvas
    31.5 x 23.6 inches

FEATURED ARTIST

Hear before hereafter

HEAR BEFORE HEREAFTER

Hear before hereafter is a film program running from June 30 to July 7, 2021 online at Los Angeles Nomadic Division (LAND). The film program features works by Jayce Salloum, Akram Zaatari, Christelle Oyiri, Roula Nassar, Reynaldo Rivera, and Basma Alsharif. Each work is posited as a music video where image follows sound. The program encourages a listening as watching experience.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2014

    Still from Deep Sleep

    by Basma Alsharif
    00:12:45
    Greece / Malta / Palestine
    HD video

  • 2014

    Still from Deep Sleep

    by Basma Alsharif
    00:12:45
    Greece / Malta / Palestine
    HD video

  • 2008, 2020

    still from untitled part 9: this time

    6:13
    Afghanistan
    HDV
    Video credits:
    Director/camera/sound/producer: Jayce Salloum
    Featuring: Ahmed Jan, Mehdi Khan Agha, Hussain Ali
    Collaborator & final translation: Khadim Ali
    Project commissioner: Haema Sivanesan
    On site translator: Muzafar Sanji
    Driver (Afghanistan): Mohammad Zia

    Out of the mouths of rural boys, finding the incomparable Mulla Nasrudin in Afghanistan.
    After my first year of art school in San Francisco in 1978, I quit, and headed to the Banff School of Fine Arts to do a year long residency program. The instructor Hu Hohn got me hooked on Sufi stories such as, "The Exploits and Subtleties of the incomparable Mulla Nasrudin". Mulla Nasrudin is a Sufi wise-fool, trickster like figure. These books were chock full of funny little contemplative meditation stories. I would read these riding the bus at night and such, to get me through trying days. Later in 2008, I'm in the central highlands of Afghanistan, in Bamiyan, where the colossal Buddha statutes were destroyed by the Taliban. A stark, arid, severe, beautiful landscape, people scrapping by, subsistence farming, much like my grandparents did in Syria. I'm filming scruffy little country boys in a new school built by Western troops. The boys are speaking Hazaragi (a Farsi dialect), via my translator but never having the time to translate responses. At the end of each session, we ask them to tell a joke or a song, something other than the conversation we’ve tried to record. Six months later when I’m back home and the rough transcript translations have been sent to me from Quetta, I discover, lo and behold, then and there were the very same Sufi stories – thirty years later – being told by these scruffy little country boys at Laisa-e-Aali Zukoor boys school, Bamiyan, Hazarajat, Afghanistan. These few days I’ve been working with my Afghan collaborator, Khadim Ali, he’s based in Sydney currently. We’re trying to work through the time zones, which goes hand in hand with the other displacements of the overarching pandemic time and space. Many thanks to the impeccable Khadim Ali, and to the translator and eternal wunderkind Muzafar Sanji; to Mohammad Zia, our stalwart driver and safe-keeper who deftly transported us over unspeakable rutted goat trails aka roads; and to all who shared with us a mat to rest or sleep on, stories, food, curious minds, and warm hearts.

  • 1995

    still from Mourning Images

    by Akram Zaatari
    00:06:10
    Lebanon
    BetacamSP video

FEATURED ARTIST

The Beatitudes of Malibu

THE BEATITUDES OF MALIBU

The Beatitudes of Malibu, at David Kordansky Gallery in Los Angeles, is an exhibition of works by more than 40 artists and poets that respond to, depict, question, or are inspired by landscapes of all kinds. The exhibition is on view through July 2, 2021.

The Beatitudes of Malibu borrows its title from a poem of the same name by Rowan Ricardo Phillips; in the poem’s eight parts, the poet engages in a series of encounters with natural, social, and aesthetic landscapes associated with Los Angeles, but also with the full spectrum of myths, narratives, and allusions these landscapes elicit. 

On the occasion of the exhibition and its accompanying poetry booklet, David Kordansky Gallery is hosting a virtual reading with poets Tongo Eisen-Martin (also reading Bob Kaufman), Gabriela Jauregui, Ann Lauterbach, and Cedar Sigo on Thursday, June 17 at 5 pm PT via Zoom.

The Beatitudes of Malibu employs a broad range of approaches to the landscape genre by bringing together artists whose paintings, drawings, sculptures, photographs, and poems are born of divergent—and often conflicting—legacies. Freely mixed, for example, are abstract and representational depictions of the natural and urban worlds. But on an even deeper level, the totality of the works on view juxtaposes a number of entirely distinct positions vis-à-vis the environments that make up a “landscape.”   

These distinctions can be geographical and generational. Lauren Halsey’s wall-based “funk mound,” is a vivid representation of what South Central Los Angeles looks and feels like both in physical reality and in the heart and mind; its realism transcends the visual realm and suggests that landscapes have an internal dimension. Other works acknowledge and confront the construction of landscape as a social invention. In mixed-media photographs by Sky Hopinka, handwritten text is etched around the edges of each image, offering reflections on what it means to be in relation to the land on emotional, psychological, and political terms; landscapes are shown to be places where individual human experiences intersect with larger forces, and where time and physical space are relative quantities. A painting by Raul Guerrero addresses the competing narrative strata that lie beneath the surface of any image of place, and pays particular attention to the ways in which Indigenous cultures, ongoing legacies of colonialism, and popular aesthetic forms populate the landscapes of the Southern California imaginary.

With respect to the various interpretations of landscape by the artists and poets featured in The Beatitudes of Malibu, we at David Kordansky Gallery would like to acknowledge that our spaces were built and physically reside on the traditional homelands once known as Tovaangar (Los Angeles basin, Southern Channel Islands) and home to the Tongva people—later referred to as Gabrieleño and Fernandeño by Spanish colonizers. We understand that acknowledging the gallery’s occupation on Tovaangar homeland calls for us to commit to continuing to learn how to be better stewards of the land we inhabit. In all facets of our work, we remain committed to creating inclusive and equitable spaces by implementing policies and practices that promote diversity and sustain an environment of mutual accountability.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2020

    They don't care about us and laugh when we turn on each other. I promised myself, no memories, no similes, still, I am deeply troubled at heart.

    by Sky Hopinka
    Inkjet print and etching
    17 x 17 inches
    Framed:
    19 x 18 5/8 x 2 inches
    Edition 2 of 3, with 2 AP

  • 2020

    I think of my home tonight. I don't have any resolutions, but I've felt so much through these streets, these neighborhoods. This land and this Land hold so much, and this pain and this Pain call for salves we already have, still needing to be wrapped and poulticed.

    by Sky Hopinka
    Inkjet print and etching
    17 x 17 inches
    Framed:
    19 x 18 5/8 x 2 inches
    Edition 2 of 3, with 2 AP

  • 2021

    may we bang you?

    by Lauren Halsey
    White cement, wood, and mixed media
    87 x 83 x 50 inches

  • 2021

    Untitled

    by Huma Bhabha
    Ink, acrylic, pastel, and collage on paper
    35 3/8 x 23 3/4 inches
    Framed:
    40 x 28 1/4 x 2 inches

FEATURED ARTIST

Rindon Johnson

RINDON JOHNSON

Rindon Johnson’s The Valley of the Moon, his first solo exhibition with François Ghebaly, arises from this landscape of lunar doubling. Through a wide range of mediums and working styles, the exhibition presents a view into Johnson’s exploration of material history, economies of value, and the porosity of being human.

The exhibition opens with a trio of dyed leather sculptures, part of an ongoing series that uses furniture grade cowhide, a byproduct from industrial beef production. Johnson smeared the skins with polyurethane, indigo, coffee, salt and woodstain, then left them outside under the elements for over a year, where they gathered flows of rust, oak leaves, and the raining ash of a California fire season. These works build on Johnson’s notion of the byproduct as a broader historical and conceptual condition. Whereas furniture leather is a byproduct of industrial animal processing, and Vaseline a byproduct of petroleum refining, Johnson proposes that American Blackness itself is a byproduct of another capitalist megaindustry: the transatlantic slave trade. The series poses a number of questions—what overlapping systems have conspired to allow us to come into being? To come into thinking? How do we reckon with and reconceptualize our place in a broader ecology of exploitations and freedoms?

Rindon Johnson was born in 1990 in San Francisco on the unceded territories and ancestral lands of the Ohlone people. He currently lives and works in Berlin where he is an Associate Fellow at the Universität der Künste Berlin. Johnson is the author of four books of essays and poetry, The Law of Large Numbers: Black Sonic Abyss (SculptureCenter/Chisenhale Gallery, 2021), Shade the King (Capricious Press, 2017), No One Sleeps Better Than White People (Inpatient Press, 2016), and the virtual reality book Meet in the Corner (Publishing-House.Me, 2017). His first institutional solo exhibition, The Law of Large Numbers, is currently on view at SculptureCenter, New York and will travel to Chisenhale Gallery, London, in fall 2021. He is shortlisted for the Future Generation Art Prize and will present new work in associated exhibitions at PinchukArtCentre in Kyiv in 2021 and Venice in 2022. His collaborative exhibition This End the Sun with Maryam Hoseini and Jordan Strafer opens at the New Museum, New York, in June, 2021.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2021

    Abnus (Purple)

    UV flatbed print on dibond
    Edition 1 of 3, 1AP
    24 x 30 inches

  • 2021

    Cairn (Grey)

    UV flatbed print on dibond
    Edition of 3, 1AP
    24 x 30 inches

  • 2021

    Cordelia (Blue)

    UV flatbed print on dibond
    Edition of 3, 1AP
    24 x 30 inches

  • 2021

    Lulu (Yellow)

    UV flatbed print on dibond
    Edition 1 of 3, 1AP
    24 x 30 inches

FEATURED ARTIST

WE RISE

WE RISE

ICA LA and Los Angeles Nomadic Division (LAND) have partnered to commission and work with artists veronique d'entremont and Julia Bogany, Megan Dorame, iris yirei hu to create original public art projects and public programs within the Los Angeles State Historic Park for Art Rise, part of the WE RISE initiative, the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (LACDMH)'s month-long series of free community programs, events and experiences highlighting the healing powers of art and connection during Mental Health Awareness Month in May

Los Angeles State Historic Park is located on a site with a syncretic history of its own. It was once an indigenous pueblo and trading site for the Tataviam, Chumash, and Tongva people, a Spanish settlement, and over the last two centuries the surrounding neighborhood has been a cultural center for Chinese, Mexican and Italian communities. On the street behind d’entremont’s installation sits St. Peter’s Italian Church, one of few remaining relics of Los Angeles’s Little Italy, where a now-aging Italian spiritual community hold processions and feasts honoring certain saints.

Pakook koy Peshaax (The Sun Enters the Earth and Leaves the Earth) is presented in loving memory of Julia Bogany, whose legacy lives on in the hearts of the Tongva community and beyond.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2021

    Pakook koy Peshaax (The Sun Enters the Earth and Leaves the Earth)

    by Julia Bogany, Megan Dorame, iris yirei hu
    Soil, compost, soapstone, wood and acrylic on canvas

  • 2021

    Pakook koy Peshaax (The Sun Enters the Earth and Leaves the Earth)

    by Julia Bogany, Megan Dorame, iris yirei hu
    Soil, compost, soapstone, wood and acrylic on canvas

  • 2021

    Their Body Became (an Antenna Transmitting the Message of God) at LA State Historic Park

    by veronique d’entremont
    Fabric, clay, graveyard dirt, ashes of the artist’s mother
    Commissioned by LAND and ICA LA.

  • 2021

    Their Body Became (an Antenna Transmitting the Message of God) at LA State Historic Park

    by veronique d’entremont
    Fabric, clay, graveyard dirt, ashes of the artist’s mother
    Commissioned by LAND and ICA LA.

FEATURED ARTIST

Jodie Mack

JODIE MACK

Screening No. 2: Five Films by Jodie Mack is now online at ecstaticstatic.com until May 30th. Free for all to watch, worldwide. This second online film program, part of an ongoing series and artist resource presented by Ecstatic Static, is dedicated to the films of experimental animator Jodie Mack and covers a selection spanning 5 years of filmmaking. 

Mack's work embodies an alternative approach to filmmaking we aim to support, through the production services we offer at Ecstatic Static. Her handmade films bring mundane objects to life, using collage to explore a tension between form and meaning. She works with material offcuts that range from fabric to paper, fragments often edited in a percussive way, that celebrate a culture of reuse and recycle. Mack’s 16mm films have screened at venues including SFMOMA, Museum of Arts and Design, BAMPFA, Locarno, the Viennale and Projections at the New York Film Festival, amongst others. In 2014, she was named one of Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces to Watch”.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2013

    Undertone Overture

    10 min, 30 sec

  • 2012

    Blanket Statement #1: Home is Where the Heart is

    3 min

  • 2014

    Razzle Dazzle

    5 min

  • 2017

    Wasteland #1: Ardent, Verdant

    4 min, 30 sec

FEATURED ARTIST

Rosemary Mayer’s Temporary Monuments

ROSEMARY MAYER’S TEMPORARY MONUMENTS

“Pleasures and Possible Celebrations”: Rosemary Mayer’s Temporary Monuments, 1977-1981 is an exhibition at Gordon Robichaux in New York.

Rosemary Mayer (1943–2014) was a prolific artist involved in the New York art scene beginning in the late 1960s. Most well-known for her large-scale sculptures using fabric as the primary material, she also created works on paper, artist books, and outdoor installations, exploring themes of temporality, history, and biography. A pioneer of the feminist art movement, she was a founding member of A.I.R. Gallery—the first cooperative gallery for women in the U.S.—where she presented one of her earliest exhibitions. Gordon Robichaux’s presentation is Mayer’s most recent in New York since a 2016 show at Southfirst Gallery, and will be followed by a survey at the Swiss Institute in September 2021. 

Installed across both spaces at Gordon Robichaux, the exhibition features a selection of drawings and documentation related to ephemeral installations and unrealized projects with balloons from the late 1970s including Spell, Some Days in April, and Connections, part of a body of work she called “Temporary Monuments.” This is the first occasion the work will be on display since it was originally exhibited in the late 1970s and early ’80s. Two related sculptures will also be on view. Scarecrow (model) for a field, made with fabric, wood, and ribbons, is a proposal for an unrealized Temporary Monument and the only extant sculpture from this period. 17th Street Ghost is a site-responsive presentation of one of Mayer’s ephemeral “Ghosts” sculptures, conceived for this exhibition by the Estate of Rosemary Mayer.

The exhibition runs until June 20, 2021.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 1981, 2021

    17th Street Ghost

    Glassine, cellophane, plastic, wood, paint, ribbons, cord, and linen thread
    81 x 105 x 84 inches

  • 1978

    Some Days in April (Poster)

    Ink and watercolor on paper
    23.5 x 17.5 inches

  • 1978-79

    Scarecrow (model) for a field

    Wood, fabric, linen thread, string, ribbons, and fiberglass
    42 x 36 x 40 inches

  • 1978

    Fabrics, Balloons, Ribbons from the Upper Windows for a Celebration in a Windy Season

    Colored pencil, graphite, ink, and pastel on paper
    26 x 40 inches

FEATURED ARTIST

Mona Varichon

MONA VARICHON

Mona Varichon is an artist and translator living in Paris, currently in residence at the Cité Internationale des Arts. Recent exhibitions and screenings of her work include the Jeu de Paume Lab (Paris, France), the ICA London (London, UK), Mascot (Los Angeles, CA), The Renaissance Society (Chicago, IL), u’s (Diamond Valley, Canada), CAPC musée d’art contemporain (Bordeaux, France), High Art (Paris, France), L’Etna (Montreuil, FR), Redcat (Los Angeles, CA), The Echo Park Film Center (Los Angeles, CA) and The Egyptian Theatre (Hollywood, CA). She is currently translating the memoirs of American underground filmmakers George and Mike Kuchar into French, to be published by her imprint Varichon & Cie.

Mona’s work is featured in the upcoming “Trending” issue of the LARB Quarterly Journal.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 2021

    La Cité des art, Épisode 2, Les cours/Classes

    HD video, color, stereo sound, 09:54 min
    This is the second episode in a four episodes mini-series commissioned by MycoTV for the ICA London’s Cinema 3 broadcast. Set at the Cité Internationale des Arts, the series examines its potential as a meeting ground, informal teaching and learning environment, and a political space. In this episode, we follow residents and non-residents as they attend freestyle dance workshops led by Cité resident Nicolas Faubert.

  • 2021

    La Cité des arts, Épisode 4, Les couloirs/The corridors

    HD video, color, stereo sound, 07:42 min
    This is the fourth episode in a four episode mini-series commissioned by MycoTV for the ICA London’s Cinema 3 broadcast. Set at the Cité Internationale des Arts, the series examines its potential as a meeting ground, informal teaching and learning environment, and a political space. In this episode, we follow Cité resident Nicolas Faubert through corridors filled with the sounds of rehearsing musicians while he relates a recent encounter with the police.

  • 2020

    Échauffement pour Air

    (in collaboration with Nicolas Faubert & Jacob Eisenmann)
    HD video, color, stereo sound, 25:17 min
    This video, commissioned by the Cité Internationale des Arts as a dialogue between resident artists and curators, follows Cité residents as they travel through Paris to different Cité locations, dancing and chatting about funerals and Leonardo Da Vinci while in an auditorium, on the subway, on the Pont Louis Philippe and in the unruly gardens of Montmartre.

  • 2016

    And What Made Me Think Of You

    HD video, color, stereo sound, 10:00 min
    Reached over the phone, the artist’s mother gets ready for work while describing streets, phantom limbs, bygone vineyards and native butterfly trees that recently reminded her of her daughter.

FEATURED ARTIST

Organic Music Societies

ORGANIC MUSIC SOCIETIES

Organic Music Societies is the first retrospective exhibition to examine Don and Moki’s collaborative practice from this fertile period. The exhibition, named after Don’s landmark album Organic Music Society (Caprice, 1973), recorded in 1971 and 1972, showcases a variety of works by Moki that exemplify both her ceaseless embellishment of the family’s domestic surroundings and her vital contributions to the settings that served as spiritual dressing for Organic Music Theatre perfor-mances. A selection of wall and doorway tapestries that have never been shown in the United States complement her early psychedelic paintings from the late ’60s. Archival materials and ephemera on display include original drawings by both Don and Moki made for use as promotional posters, as well as books and periodicals to which the Cherrys contributed, such as Huvudbladet and the catalog for the 1971 Moderna Museet exhibition “Utopias & Visions 1871–1981.”

The exhibition is organized by Lawrence Kumpf, Artistic Director, and Naima Karlsson with Adrian Rew, Associate.

ARTIST WEBSITE




SELECTED WORK

  • 1976

    Organic Music

    Textile appliqué
    69 ⅝ × 69 ⅝ inches

  • 1968

    Untitled

    Textile appliqué
    21 ⅞ × 27 ¾ inches

PRESS ENTER TO SEARCH, OR ESC TO EXIT